Pet Health Articles

  • Is there any truth to the old adage, "You can't teach an old dog new tricks?"

  • Dogs are smart. But how did they get that way and just how smart are they? Here are a few of the tests that canine behaviorists may perform in controlled laboratory settings aimed at learning more about how dogs learn and how much they learn and how often they apply what they’ve learned to certain situations.

  • Dog communication uses most of the senses, including smells, sounds and visual cues. Pheromones, glandular secretions, barks, whines, yips, growls, body postures, etc., all serve as effective means of communication between dogs. Unlike in people, canine body postures and olfactory (scent) cues are significant components of dog language and vocal communications are less significant. People are listeners; dogs are watchers.

  • Spraying is the deposition of small amounts of urine on vertical surfaces. In most cases, the spraying cat will back into the area, the tail may quiver, and with little or no crouching, will urinate.

  • The birth of a baby or the adoption of a new child is associated with a great deal of anxiety, excitement, and stress for not only the family, but also the family pet. Some dogs and cats can have a difficult time adjusting to these changes, especially if this is your first child, but preparation and planning will help.

  • Getting a puppy? What kind of dog do you want: big or small, long haired or short haired, pure bred or sweetly mixed? Have you located a litter of available pups? Do you know how to pick just the right pup from the litter to call your very own?

  • There are many types of collars and harnesses that are used for restraining or training dogs, ranging from simple strap collars to head halters; in the case of collars and harnesses, one size (or type) does not fit all. Functionality, comfort and safety should be the prime considerations in any choice. It is important to recognize that different designs have different purposes and control the dog in different ways.

  • The goal of training is to teach the pet a response that is desirable and to associate a command word with that behavior. To be successful, you must first be able to get the pet to exhibit the desired behavior reliably before adding the command.

  • In dogs, compulsive behaviors include acral lick dermatitis, flank sucking, pacing, circling, incessant or rhythmic barking, fly snapping or chasing unseen objects, freezing and staring, polydipsia (excessive drinking), sucking, licking, or chewing on objects (or owners), tonguing or licking the air and other forms of self mutilation.

  • Dogs tend to pull ahead and lunge forward for a number of reasons. The primary reasons for most dogs are that they are exploratory, playful, and social, and that they are motivated to investigate new areas, new odors, new people or new dogs, as well as areas where exciting things have been found in the past.