Pet Health Articles

  • Cytology is the microscopic examination of cells that have been collected from body tissues. By examining the appearance of these cells and looking for inflammation or infection, it is often possible to diagnose specific diseases or determine the nature of a pet's illness (see article 'Cytology - General' for an introduction to Cytology).

  • Cytology is the microscopic examination of cells that have been collected from the body. By examining the appearance of these cells, including their number, size, shape, color, internal characteristics, and how they fit together with their neighbors, it is often possible to make a diagnosis of a specific disease process.

  • Cytology is the microscopic examination of cells that have been collected from the body. By examining the appearance of these cells, including their number, size, shape, color, internal characteristics, and how they fit together with their neighbors, it is often possible to make a diagnosis of a specific disease process.

  • Two tests use dexamethasone (a synthetic cortisol) for diagnosing Cushing's disease or Cushing's syndrome. They are the "LOW DOSE" and the "HIGH DOSE" dexamethasone suppression test.

  • Generally, the following screening tests are recommended when diabetes mellitus is suspected: a complete blood count (CBC), a serum biochemistry profile, and a urinalysis.

  • Diskospondylitis involves infection and inflammation of the disks between the vertebrae in the spine. The most common first clinical signs are difficulty getting up from a down position, reluctance to jump, and an abnormal, unstable gait, including lameness.

  • Sometimes called the “blue print of life”, DNA is a complex protein that carries the genetic code of an organism. All common forms of life, such as viruses, bacteria, plants, and animals carry a complete copy of their own DNA in each of their cells.

  • Albumin is an important protein that is normally found in blood, but is not normally present in the urine of healthy pets.

  • Eclampsia (hypocalcemia or puerperal tetany) is an emergency medical condition associated with a life-threatening drop in blood calcium levels that occurs in nursing mothers. Eclampsia occurs most commonly when the puppies are one to five weeks of age and the mother is producing the most milk.

  • An electrocardiogram (ECG, or EKG, using the German spelling) is a recording of the electrical impulses that are generated when the heart is beating. When any irregular heart rhythm is detected on clinical examination, an electrocardiogram should be performed.