Pet Health Articles

  • Tellington TTouch® was developed by Linda Tellington-Jones as a method of behavioral modification and animal treatment without the use of force. Today, it is used on animals and people to reduce tension and also treat some stress related problems.

  • Clicker training is used as a means of clearly and immediately reinforcing a behavior in virtually any species of animal.

  • A bird may bite out of fear or aggression. They may be protecting their territory or asserting their dominance. Their powerful beak can break the skin and hurt. If your bird tries to bite you, remember to keep your fingers together and curled inward.

  • Your interaction with your new kitten begins on the ride home. Cats should always be transported in some kind of carrier in the car. By teaching your kitten to ride in a confined location you are providing safety as well as starting a routine that you can maintain for future car rides.

  • Is there any truth to the old adage, "You can't teach an old dog new tricks?"

  • Dogs are smart. But how did they get that way and just how smart are they? Here are a few of the tests that canine behaviorists may perform in controlled laboratory settings aimed at learning more about how dogs learn and how much they learn and how often they apply what they’ve learned to certain situations.

  • Dog communication uses most of the senses, including smells, sounds and visual cues. Pheromones, glandular secretions, barks, whines, yips, growls, body postures, etc., all serve as effective means of communication between dogs. Unlike in people, canine body postures and olfactory (scent) cues are significant components of dog language and vocal communications are less significant. People are listeners; dogs are watchers.

  • Cats are highly attached to territory, and movement away from that secure base is not something that is undertaken lightly! Traveling in cars, planes and other forms of human transportation can be a very stressful experience for all concerned, in part because the cat is no longer in control of its own experience.

  • Most male animals that are kept for companionship, work, or food production (stallions, dogs, tomcats, bulls, rams and boars) are neutered (castrated) unless they are intended to be used as breeding stock.

  • There are many circumstances in which keeping a cat indoors may be safer for the cat and therefore, arguably, better for the cat. Indoor cats are at lower risk for injuries associated with the outdoor environment (cars, trains, dogs, predators, humans, etc.) and are at far less risk of contracting parasites and infectious diseases such as feline leukemia, feline infectious peritonitis and feline immunodeficiency virus.