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Bloat: Gastric Dilatation and Volvulus in Dogs

What is GDV?

Gastric Dilatation and Volvulus (GDV) is a life threatening disorder most commonly seen in large, deep-chested dogs, although any dog may be affected. In its early stage, the stomach fills with gas, causing a simple gastric dilatation or "bloat". Sometimes, the condition progresses no further than a bloat. A GDV is a progression of the bloat into a volvulus, in which the huge, gas-filled stomach twists upon itself so that both the entrance and exit of the stomach become blocked. This is a life-threatening emergency that requires surgery to correct. bloat-gastric_dilatation_and_volvulus-1_-_2009

 

What causes the condition?

The exact cause is still unknown. The condition is seen most commonly in large breed dogs that eat or drink rapidly and then exercise vigorously.

"Stress may be a contributing factor to GDV..."

Stress may be a contributing factor to GDV—in recent studies, dogs that were more relaxed and calm were at less risk of developing GDV than dogs described as "hyper" or "fearful".

 

Is GDV serious?

Yes. This is probably one of the most serious non-traumatic conditions seen in dogs. Immediate (within minutes to a few hours) veterinary attention is required to save the dog's life.

 

Are some dogs more prone than others?

Yes, statistically we know that large, deep-chested breeds are more prone to GDV. These include Great Danes, Saint Bernards, Weimaraners, Irish Setters, Gordon Setters, Standard Poodles, Basset Hounds, Doberman Pinschers, and Old English Sheepdogs.  In a recent study, the top three breeds found to be at risk of bloat were 1) Great Dane, 2) St. Bernard, and 3) Weimaraner. It must be noted that any dog can bloat, even dachshunds and Chihuahuas. The condition has been reported to most commonly occur two to three hours after eating a large meal, although bloat and GDV can occur at any time.

Additional facts about GDV:

Factors Increasing the Risk of Bloat

Factors Decreasing the Risk of Bloat

 

Is it possible to distinguish between gastric dilatation (GD) and gastric dilatation and volvulus (GDV)?

No. These two conditions often look identical on physical examination. X-rays and other diagnostic tests are necessary to determine if the stomach has twisted.

bloat-gastric_dilatation_and_volvulus-2

 

Why does the dog collapse?

The gas filled stomach presses on the large veins in the abdomen that carry blood back to the heart, compromising the circulation of blood.

"Vital tissues are deprived of blood and oxygen, resulting in systemic shock."

Vital tissues are deprived of blood and oxygen, resulting in systemic shock. In addition, the pressure of the gas on the stomach wall results in inadequate circulation to the wall, causing tissue death. Digestion ceases and toxins accumulate in the blood, worsening the shock. As the stomace continues to swell, the stomach wall can rupture.

 

What can be done to treat bloat or GVD?

This is an immediate and life-threatening emergency and requires immediate veterinary intervention.

It is imperative that the pressure on the stomach wall and internal organs is reduced as soon as possible. The veterinarian may first attempt to pass a stomach tube. If this is not possible due to twisting of the stomach, a large bore needle may be inserted through the skin into the stomach to relieve the pressure in the stomach.

Shock treatment must begin immediately, using intravenous fluids and emergency medications. Once the patient becomes stable, surgical correction of the GDV must be performed. It may be necessary to delay this major abdominal surgery until the patient is able to undergo anesthesia.

 

How is the surgery done?

bloat

The primary goals of surgery are to return the stomach to its normal position, to remove any dead or dying stomach tissues and to help prevent future GDV. Several different techniques may be used, including gastropexy (suturing the stomach wall to the abdominal wall) and pyloroplasty (surgically opening of the pylorus to improve stomach outflow). Your veterinarian will determine the most appropriate technique or combination of techniques for your pet's condition.

 

What is the survival rate?

This depends on many factors; how long the pet has had GDV, the degree of shock, the severity of the condition, cardiac problems, stomach wall necrosis, length of surgery, etc.

Even in relatively uncomplicated cases, there is a mortality rate of 15-20% for GDV. In a recent study, if heart arrhythmias were also present at the time of diagnosis, the mortality rate increased to 38%; if tissue damage was severe enough to require removal of part of the stomach, the mortality rate jumped to 28% to 38%; if the spleen was removed, the mortality rate was 32% to 38%.

 

Can the condition be prevented?

Gastropexy (surgical attachment of stomach to the body wall) is the most effective means of prevention. In high-risk breeds, some veterinarians recommend prophylactic (preventative) gastropexy, to be performed at the time of spay or neuter.

"This does not prevent dilatation (bloat) but does prevent twisting (volvulus) in the majority of cases."

This does not prevent dilatation (bloat) but does prevent twisting (volvulus) in the majority of cases. Without gastropexy, the recurrence rate of bloat has been reported to be as high as 75%.

Careful attention to diet, feeding and exercise regimens may help to prevent gastric dilatation.

Please do not hesitate to discuss any concerns you have regarding this serious condition with your veterinarian.

Ernest Ward, DVM
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