Pet Health Articles

  • Since we want the best for our pets, we should include them in the go green movement. Here are a few ways you can create a cleaner, greener home for you and your pet.

  • Acetaminophen (Tylenol®, Paracetamol, APAP, N-acetyl-p-aminophenol) is a pain relief and fever-reducing medicine people use for many types of pain.

  • Acetaminophen is a medication that is used to treat fever and/or pain in humans. Cats have a genetic deficiency in a metabolic pathway in the liver that makes cats vulnerable to acetaminophen toxicity.

  • Traditionally, the terms “food allergy” and “food intolerance” have been used to describe any and all adverse food reactions in cats. The term “food allergy” or “sensitivity” is really most accurately applied when the immune system is involved in creating the signs and symptoms that result. “Food intolerance” is a far more accurate term to describe adverse food reactions in cats that cover a large category of reactions that do not involve the immune system and are generally digestive issues.

  • Anorexia is a decrease or loss of appetite for food. While hunger is physiologically driven, appetite is psychologically driven. There are two types of anorexia: true anorexia and “pseudo-anorexia.”

  • The proper administration of eye medications is essential for your cat's prompt recovery. Make sure that you wash your hands both before and after administering the medication to avoid contamination and prevent the spread of infection. Before you begin, read the ointment label so you understand the instructions.

  • Applying topical medications to your pet can sometimes be a challenge. This information may help make treating your pet easier - for both of you.

  • Approximately 20% of cats across all ages suffer from painful osteoarthritis in one or more joints. The incidence of osteoarthritis increases with age. Because cats are living longer, it is more likely than ever that every cat owner will face the issue of osteoarthritis at some point.

  • Atrial fibrillation describes very rapid contractions, or ‘twitching’, of the heart muscle, confined to the atria, or the top chambers. Most of the time, atrial fibrillation in cats occur secondary to heart disease.

  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM), and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) stand united in their position that feeding raw food to cats is potentially dangerous to both the cat and to you. In the most recent study conducted, nearly 25% of the raw food samples tested positive for harmful bacteria, including Salmonella ssp. and Listeria monocytogenes.